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Schizophrenia - Diabetes Risk Associated with Schizophrenia Drugs
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Diabetes Risk Associated with Schizophrenia Drugs
(HealthDay News)
by -- Jane Parry
Updated: Oct 5th 2006

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THURSDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among schizophrenics taking medication for their condition, about one-third of new-onset diabetes cases may be attributable to their anti-psychotic medication, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Bruce L. Lambert, Ph.D., of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues conducted a study of 15,767 schizophrenics from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration. The cohort had no pre-existing diabetes, had been prescribed olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine or haloperidol, and was followed-up for one year. The reference group was patients taking haloperidol.

Compared with the reference group, the risk of diabetes was increased equally across the other three drug groups and the risk was higher among patients younger than 50. On the assumption that there was a causal relationship between diabetes and the anti-psychotic medication, one-third of new diabetes cases could be attributed to the drugs, the investigators conclude.

However, they point out that there were few women in the study cohort and caution against generalizing their findings to users of other anti-psychotic drugs. "Since we did not study ziprasidone or aripiprazole, the newest second-generation anti-psychotic agents, no conclusions should be drawn from our study about their potential for causing diabetes," the authors write.

The study was partially supported by a research contract from Bristol-Myers Squibb.

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